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Celia's Story
Posted Sept. 12, 2005

Well here I go with my story. I am all for having the ability to have a family, no matter how we do it. I was married for 5 years and trying to conceive was just a nightmare. No matter what time of day or what cycle, it seemed like it wasn't going to happen. I found that really odd, simply because I had been pregnant previously and had a normal birth. My husband already had 2 other children from his previous marriage.

So off I went to the doctors for a smear and all the other stuff we ladies need to do, the doctor could see no reason why I could fail. He referred me to a OBGYN, for further discussions. My husband encouraged me to go.

After more testing he (the obgyn) suggested that I have a procedure called a cryotherapy*. Still nothing, so it was time for my husband to be checked. Bingo, we found the problem. He had no sperm whatsoever.

I was totally shocked. We opted for donor sperm, had a lot of talks about whether to go ahead with it or not and whether to tell the child as he/she got older.

We went on overtime and had 3 children via donor, the eldest is now 16 and the youngest 11.

Sadly to say, our marriage broke down. I discovered medical records showing that my husband had had a vasectomy 9 yrs prior to meeting me. He left that bit out, I guess...

Anyway I have 3 wonderful kids. Two of the children have known for a while how they got here, but the youngest did not. I informed her tonight and explained it the best way I could.

I was astonished by her response. She told me she was picked out and not a mistake. Pheww!

I wouldnt change anything if I had to do this again. I am now remarried but I had a hysterectomy last year so no more children for me. The best thing of all is that my new husband now wishes to adopt the children, and again their response was clearly, "Geez mum, picked twice!"

Am I a lucky mum or what :-)?

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*About Cryotherapy:

Cryotherapy is performed on a woman's cervix after a biopsy confirms cervical dysplasia or condyloma. It is performed on an outpatient basis and takes approximately ten minutes.

During cryotherapy, a probe is placed on the cervix and cooled to a temperature below freezing. The probe is then warmed and the process is repeated. Once freezing of the cervix is done, the probe is removed from the cervix.

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