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Dawn's Story
Posted April 3, 2006

When I was in college, I went for my yearly exam and was told that I may have endometriosis. The Dr. said not to worry but it could cause infertility issues. At that time I didn't think a lot of it, but four years later it changed my life.

My husband and I only waited about 6 months after our wedding ('00) to decide to actively try to get pregnant (we joke that we had unofficially been trying for five years since we never used protection in college). I made an appointment with my gynecologist and she immediate started me on Clomid followed by blood work to check my thyroid and pituitary gland.

When my blood work came back I received a call that was slightly disturbing; my Dr. said my blood work indicated a hyperactive pituitary gland which could indicate a brain tumor. I had an MRI that week and found I did not have a tumor, my pituitary gland just produced too many hormones and it was keeping me from ovulating

I thought 'what a relief, now I know what the issue is and I can fix it'. Well, it wasn't quite that easy. After about 8 months on medication for my pituitary gland and on clomid, my Dr. decided we needed more tests.

I had a dye test done to check if my tubes were open. The good news was that they were open. The bad news was there was a large cyst on my right ovary. So on to surgery to remove the cyst.

During my laparoscopic surgery to remove the cyst, my Dr. found severe damage from an extreme case of endometriosis. The damage was so extensive that my bladder was adhered to my ovary and my tubes were destroyed.

My gynecologist then referred us to an infertility specialist. We met with the RE and were told our only viable option was IVF. By this time, I had been on clomid and other drugs for over a year and felt completely devastated. We could not afford the cost of IVF, so we decided to take a break to think about our next steps.

The next day I started looking at my company's insurance policies. I found one that covered 70% of IVF cost. The issue now was that I had to wait until the next enrollment period to sign up. We decided to stop all of my medication and wait until I could change our insurance and then try IVF.

In January of '03 we went back to the RE and set up our first IVF attempt. My retrieval went well and 22 eggs were retrieved with 12 fertilizing. We had 2 transferred and three made it to freezing. The bad news is it didn't work.

I didn't want to give up and started another IVF cycle as soon as possible. Once again I had 22 eggs retrieved with 15 fertilized. We had three transferred. I then got a call that none of the remaining embryos made it to freezing and just knew the transfer would not work.

Two weeks later, the phone call came in and I made my husband answer because I didn't think I could handle the bad news. To my surprise, it was positive. I cried for the next three hours.

At 6 weeks we had our sonogram (ultrasound) and found there were two sacs but only one heartbeat. We were both so thrilled that there was a heartbeat!! 32 weeks later I gave birth to a very healthy 9lbs baby boy.

Three years from the time we had our first embryos frozen we are back to give it a try. Surprisingly, all three survived the thaw but we only transferred two. I am patiently waiting for my beta test this Friday to find out if we will experience the joy of having another child.

 

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